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Conflict On The Saltbush Plains

from 350.00
conflict_on_the_saltbush_plains.jpg

Conflict On The Saltbush Plains

from 350.00

Conflict On The Saltbush Plains
This is a coloured pencil drawing by Chris McClelland Wildprints

Two buck red kangaroos viciously duel for mob supremacy on the vast rolling saltbush plains of NSW’s Riverina.  Powerful kicks from the hind-legs give devastating blows to the lower body while lethal eye-gorging hand claws reach out and upset the focus of opponents.  A third big buck on the edge of the clay-pan contemplates his chances and may well enter the fray at his best opportunity.  A young doe looks on, oblivious of nature’s and her role in the confrontation.

“Conflict on the Saltbush Plains” Unframed Limited Edition Giclee Prints 300 signed & numbered by Chris with a Certificate of Authenticity
Size 600 mm x 500 mm 

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Conflict On The Saltbush Plains
This is a coloured pencil drawing by Chris McClelland Wildprints

Two buck red kangaroos viciously duel for mob supremacy on the vast rolling saltbush plains of NSW’s Riverina.  Powerful kicks from the hind-legs give devastating blows to the lower body while lethal eye-gorging hand claws reach out and upset the focus of opponents.  A third big buck on the edge of the clay-pan contemplates his chances and may well enter the fray at his best opportunity.  A young doe looks on, oblivious of nature’s and her role in the confrontation.

“Conflict on the Saltbush Plains” Unframed Limited Edition Giclee Prints 300 signed & numbered by Chris with a Certificate of Authenticity
Size 600 mm x 500 mm 

Having spent forty odd years on the land, I have often had the opportunity to stop and observe big buck kangaroos fighting on the saltbush plains.  In this scene, an older red kangaroo is challenged by a younger male while another buck looks on waiting for an opportunity to take on the dominant male.  A female also looks on, approvingly.

The fighting general means the most dominate male wins to father the next generation.

I usually draw wildlife to tell a story, which takes years of gathering material on animal behaviour, especially with my African subjects.  There is no challenge in just ‘painting a pretty picture’ of an animal.  Besides, it adds a little more creativity to the work, a term which the mainstream art world harp on when they blatantly reject realism because of their tainted ideological view that it lacks expressionism and creativity.

The drawing was done with Faber-Castell Polychromos coloured pencils.