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A Formidable Display

from 350.00
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A Formidable Display

from 350.00

Chris finished this drawing at the end of June 2013 as it was selected to hang in the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize held at the South Australian Museum, Adelaide, South Australia

“A Formidable Display” Unframed Limited Edition Giclee Prints 300 signed & numbered by Chris with a Certificate of Authenticity

Large Print 950 x 570 mm

Small Print 560 x 360 mm

Graphite & coloured pencils.

Finalist Artists For Conservation exhibition in Vancouver, Canada.

2013 winner "Animals in Art" Exhibition AGRA Gallery

Finalist Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize - Adelaide

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Chris finished this drawing at the end of June 2013 as it was selected to hang in the Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize held at the South Australian Museum, Adelaide, South Australia

“A Formidable Display” Unframed Limited Edition Giclee Prints 300 signed & numbered by Chris with a Certificate of Authenticity

Large Print 950 x 570 mm

Small Print 560 x 360 mm

Graphite & coloured pencils.

Finalist Artists For Conservation exhibition in Vancouver, Canada.

2013 winner "Animals in Art" Exhibition AGRA Gallery

Finalist Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize - Adelaide

Due to their proximity to human activity in lakes, rivers and waterways, the hippopotamus is one of the most dangerous animals in Africa and accountable for more human deaths and injuries than caused by any other large animal.

Margie and I have passed close to these so called lumbering creatures with respectful awe on our many canoe and mokoro adventures along rivers, lakes and floodwaters in South Africa, Zimbabwe, Zambia and Botswana. 

The timely tapping on the gunwale with the paddle warns these submerged and antagonistic beasts of your presence and the hope, sometimes false, that they will give you safe and uneventful passage!

In this graphite and coloured pencil drawing, the typical aggressive display by the large tusked territorial bull is shown by the huge gape (up to 150°) of the ivory canine and tooth filled mouth as a younger bold intruder makes his challenge.  One of the females of the pod shows her protective nature as she covers her calf, resting dangerously in close proximity to the attack.

The scene is set in the Okavango Delta as incoming seasonal floodwaters bring new life to the once parched waterways of the delta.  A baobab and fan palms can be seen on the termite raised tree island in the background.

This mostly herbivorous animal is now believed to be more closely related to the cetaceans (dolphins and whales), sharing common traits and links.

 AWARDS:  This drawing was selected as a finalist in the prestigious Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize held in Adelaide 2013.